Homeschool Kindergarten Science

Getting ready for homeschool kindergarten?  Here are some great, hands-on resources for homeschool kindergarten science. 

 Big List of Homeschool Kindergarten Science activities, experiments and areas of study.

Force, Motion, and Energy

[Read more...]

Describing With Adjectives

As kids learn to write creatively, picking up vivid sensory details is key.  Describing with adjectives that paint a picture and appeal to the reader’s senses is the goal. We love to learn via our favorite books and recently we were inspired by {affiliate link} Elephant and Piggie’s Should I Share My Ice Cream? by the amazing Mo Willems

Learning About Adjectives with Elephant and Piggie

In Should I Share My Ice Cream?, Gerald the Elephant describes his ice cream cone, using words like “tasty” and “sweet”.  The words are printed into the shape of an ice cream cone.  We thought that was pretty neat and decided to try it ourselves. 

Cut out some simple shapes with construction paper, grab some markers and you are ready to go.

You can have your child write the words, or you can write the words for them. The important thing is that they are thinking and coming up with great descriptive adjectives.

If your child gets stuck, here are some prompts to help.

Prompts for Describing With Adjectives

What color is it? What shape? What is it’s weight? What texture? Size? How does it behave?

Lets look at a real cloud/taste an actual ice cream cone and see if that inspires us.

For objects they cannot touch or see up close:  What does the cloud look like? What might it feel like, or smell like or taste like or sound like? 

See if your child can fill in the blank: “A butterfly’s wings are like…..”  They are as light as a…..”

More Resources for Learning Parts of Speech

For more ideas on how to develop kids as Creative Writers, visit our sponsor, Brave Writer.
Brave Writer creative writing curriculum for kids

Schoolhouse Rock video about adjectives: 

 

Fun Science Experiments for Kids ~ Hydrofoils

This fun and easy hands-on science experiment, using three ingredients you already have, is perfect for warm weather outside, or not-so-nice weather inside. Hydrofoils use water (that’s the hydro) and tinfoil (yup, you guessed it) to demonstrate the concept of buoyancy.  

Big thanks to Holly Homer and Rachel Miller of Kids Activities Blog and their new book {affiliate link}101 Kids Activities That Are the Bestest, Funnest Ever!: The Entertainment Solution for Parents, Relatives & Babysitters! for some fun science experiments for kids, including this one. More on their fab book in a minute.

Hydrofoils:  Water Science Experiments for Kids from "101 Kids Activities that are the Bestest, Funnest Ever!"

Supplies Needed

  • Water in a container, bathtub or sink.
  • Tinfoil.
  • Pennies.

This experiment is about design:  Designing a boat that can float well and hold the pennies without taking on water, testing it and re-designing it again uses critical thinking skills

Fun Science Experiments for Kids - Hydrofoils @creeksidelearn

I gave the kids two different types of tinfoil, one was heavier than the other, but I let them discover that for themselves. They each set out to build, test and re-build their boats.  

While they worked, we talked about the concepts included in the experiment from the book:  Water pressure pushing up and gravity pulling the boat down. That’s buoyancy. 

 Fun Science Experiments for Kids - Hydrofoils

They made big foil boats and small foil boats and experimented with flattening the bottoms of the boats by pressing them on the sidewalk. 

Hydrofoils were a hit! We hope you will like them, too.

101 Kids Activities That Are the Bestest Funnest Ever by Holly Homer and Rachel Miller

101 Kids Activities That Are the Bestest, Funnest Ever!: The Entertainment Solution for Parents, Relatives & Babysitters! contains even more fun science experiments for kids, as well as crafts, games and boredom busters.  I love how each activity contains clear instructions and way to modify things for older or younger kids.  Each activity is geared towards kids from toddlers to 12-year-olds. Holly Homer and Rachel Miller are on a mission to create great activities for kids every day. You can find them at Kids Activities Blog and on Facebook and Pinterest

For more summer fun and learning ideas…

 Follow Julie Kirkwood, Creekside Learning’s board Summer on Pinterest.

I received this book for free for the purpose of review. All opinions are my own. Read my disclosure page. Affiliate links in this post go to Amazon. I receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you, if a purchase is made via these links. Thank you. 

Telling Time Activities : Make a Hula Hoop Clock

Here is something I’ve learned as a mom over and over again:  Math is more fun outside! It’s true. If you are looking for telling time activities for kids, grab a hula hoop and some sidewalk chalk and you are ready to go. 

Telling Time Activities

Send the kids in search of sticks and break them to the right lengths for an hour hand and a minute hand. Soaking the chalk in water for a few minutes makes the colors brighter and easier to see. 

Call out times or write them in chalk using digital time and have your kids move the hands of the hula hoop clock to the correct time.  

You may also like:

Follow Creekside Learning on Pinterest.

 Visit Julie Kirkwood, Creekside Learning’s profile on Pinterest.

Fun Art Projects for Kids ~ Painting On Trees

Did you know you could paint trees? Never really thought about it, did you? Me either. Until the other day, when my kids and I stumbled upon the idea, playing with art supplies outside. If you’re looking for fun art projects for kids this summer, add this to your list. It’s fun and can be done over and over again. All you need is a little paint. . 

Summer Art Projects for Kids ~~ Painting Trees from Creekside Learning

No trees were harmed in this art project.  We used {affiliate link*} Washable Liquid Tempera Paint.  Indeed, it washed off with a rain storm later that night. 

We painted with brushes…

Paint a tree. Info on paint that won't harm trees. From Creekside Learning.

…and, we painted with our hands. What a great sensory experience! The cool paint going onto hands with tickly brushes, feeling the rough bark of the tree and the patterns in the lines of bark.

 Sensory Art: Painting Trees With Our Hands | Creekside Learning

 You might also enjoy…

Summer Art for Kids:  Painting Trees from Creekside Learning.

 *Affiliate links go to sites, such as Amazon. If you click on the link and purchase a product, I may get a small commission, but at no cost to you, the buyer.  Thank you! 

Follow Creekside Learning on Pinterest.
Visit Julie Kirkwood, Creekside Learning’s profile on Pinterest.